5-Star Nursing Home

Kudos to the outstanding staff at the Oahe Manor here in Gettysburg. The Manor is rated a 5-Star Nursing Home according to the latest national nursing home report. 

Requests

Michael James Lofberg, McGinity son of Bea McGinity, grandson of Mae McGinity, is interested in stories of the 1909-1950's that anyone is willing to share.

The Dakota Sunset Museum needs donations of GHS yearbooks -- 1979 through 2015.

Genealogist wants to buy a copy of the book THE SUN RISES ON THE HOVENS.

Prairie Living

 Information
* City of Gettysburg
* Potter County News
* Gettysburg weather
* County seat for Potter County
 
* For Genealogy, obituaries, and local history contact the Dakota Sunset Museum      

*Churches: Catholic, Methodist, Lutheran, Mormon,  Mennonite

*Medical Facilities:  Community Care Clinic,   Avera Gettysburg Hospital [includes Oahe Manor Nursing Home and Oahe Villa Apartments with optional assistance], Latinow Dental Clinic, Vision Care Associates, Wolff Chiropractic Clinic, Vilas Pharmacy.

* Airport, Medical Helicopter Landing Pad at the hospital

*Emergency Services: Volunteer Fire Department, Volunteer Ambulance Service with certified EMTs,  Medical Helicopter Landing Pad at the hospital, Airport.

Hidden Treasures

> Specialty nut rolls at the Gettysburg Bakery.  They mail them all over the USA.
> South Dakota coffees at The Coffee Bean. 
> World class steak dinners.
> Medical services - apartments, clinic, lab, x-ray, nursing home, & hospital -- all under one roof.


ENTERTAINMENT OF INFINITE VARIETY
City Parks - 2 city parks with play areas, basketball courts, lighted tennis courts, picnic areas, restrooms & showers

State Park - West Whitlock State Park has camping sites, restrooms with showers, swimming beach, fish cleaning stations, & a boat ramp

Bowling

Hunting - pheasant, deer, geese, ducks, grouse, partridge, antelope. Guides available.

Golf - 9-hole city golf course with beautiful grass greens and watered fairways

Fishing - walleye, salmon, catfish, northern pike, and more. Guides available.

Water sports - nearby Lake Oahe and in-town swimming pools

Free Camping at Gettysburg's main city park

Fee Campsites - some with laundry facilities

Library - The Potter County Library has print books, e-books, magazines, videos, audios and wireless Internet access: Potter County Library Website

Museum - Dakota Sunset Museum

WITHIN AN HOUR-ISH OF GETTYSBURG, SD.
  1. Tour the Dakota Sunset Museum, home of the sacred Lakota Medicine Rock, and showcase for the history of Gettysburg and Potter County. A special treat is a cannon from the Battle of Gettysburg. Dakota Sunset Museum Website
  2. View the inspiring Veterans' Memorial and artillery exhibit on the grounds of the historic Potter County courthouse in Gettysburg.
  3. See the historic round barn that sits a few miles off the main road north of Gettysburg.
  4. Tour the magnificent Cathedral of the Prairies at Hoven, SD, twenty miles away - crowns the landscape with its twin spires.
  5. See the Bactrian (double-humped) camels and reindeer at the Tip Top Camel and Reindeer Ranch 12 miles west of Bowdle.
  6. Tour bandleader Lawrence Welk’s family home at Strasburg, ND.
  7. View Oscar Howe’s ten murals painted on the walls of Mobridge’s city auditorium as a WPA project in 1942.
  8. Tour the Railroad Museum at Faith, SD.
  9. Travel scenic Highway 1804.
  10. Enjoy Aberdeen's Storybook Land built in remembrance of Aberdonian L. Frank Baum, author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
  11. Fish for walleye all year long on Lake Oahe from G’Burg to Mobridge - the Walleye Capital of the World. 
  12. Take college classes at Capital University Center in Pierre or at Northern State University in Aberdeen.
EDUCATION
Gettysburg has a K-12 school system with top-notch teachers and supportive parents.  The community broke ground for a new school in 2014 and opened the doors when school began in 2015.

** The system supports an excellent school library, Internet parent portal, an online encyclopedia, champion sports teams, and a delicious lunch and breakfast program.

** It is rated a  Distinguished School 
** Gettysburg School Website

GETTYSBURG'S GREAT HISTORY

RICH IN HISTORY
  1. The Dakota Sunset Museum showcases area history and houses 125 yrs. of obituaries. Museum Website: Dakota Sunset Museum Website
  2. The Potter County Library in downtown Gettysburg is the home of Potter County genealogy books  as well as the Heritage Quest and Ancestry.com databases. Potter County Library Website

                         GETTYSBURG - Past and Present
Veterans of the Civil War founded Gettysburg in 1883. The group sought to name the new town Meade in honor of General Meade, renowned for his leadership in the Battle of Gettysburg.  When the Post Office rejected that name because it was already too popular, Captain John W. Kennedy, a member of Gen. Howard’s 11th Corps during the Battle of Gettysburg, submitted the name Gettysburg instead.  That was accepted. One hundred eight years later, Gettysburg, SD, and Gettysburg, PA, became “sister-cities” because of their shared heritage.

The founding veterans laid claim to the area through the government program of scripping.  History relates that in the very beginning the town was made up of two tents, one called a wedge tent just large enough to shelter one person, the other a wall tent, being 8x10 and considered a great luxury, and a covered wagon known as the Prairie Schooner.  What water they had was hauled from the now dry creek bed of Artichoke. 

But all did not go well.  Personal differences interrupted the deal the founding men had made.  After some months, Captain Bryson stepped in and offered free lots to anyone who would move his buildings from the old town site into Bryson’s addition.  By the spring of 1884, the problems had been licked and the entire business block had been moved.

The first church service was held in a tent the second week after the men arrived. The first church building in Gettysburg was located above a tin shop on Main Street.  The first school was organized in 1885 above that same tin shop.  For a long time the Buffalo House, a frontier hotel and boarding house, was the recreational center for the little settlement. The first saloon is said to have sported a sign that read, “Who enters here leaves hope behind.” 

The Post Office was established in 1883, as was the first newspaper. The first bank was established in 1884.  Telephone service arrived in 1906 and the first volunteer fire department was organized in 1909.

Although the first physician, Dr. M.H. Willy, came in 1883 and drug store services in 1885, hospital services had to wait until 1952.

Legal services were here before Gettysburg existed.  Samuel Cosand, a lawyer from Indiana, came to this area of Dakota Territory in 1881 and stayed the rest of his life.

The town has survived prairie fires, a Typhoid epidemic, blizzards, an Indian scare, and a devastating tornado. 

There are 11 cemeteries in the area, some dating back to the 1800s.  Most of the Civil War veterans are buried in the Gettysburg Cemetery and are marked by the traditional white military stones.

From 1955-1968, Eagle Peak, a high point near Gettysburg, was home to the 903rd Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron, locally known as the Air Force Radar Base.   Today the Federal Communication Commission operates a facility on the site.

Gettysburg is the county seat for Potter County, but it wasn’t always so.  The county, created in 1875 and organized in 1883, was first named Ashmore County in honor of a territorial legislator.  In 1877 it was renamed for Dr. Joel Potter, a member of that year’s Territorial Legislature.

The county commissioners held their first meeting Dec. 27, 1883, at the temporary county seat in Forest City.  In April of 1884, an election was held to establish a permanent county seat, and Gettysburg won by overwhelming majority.  A fierce struggle ensued. Finally 100 men forcibly took the documents from the temporary courthouse in Forest City and moved them to Gettysburg. 

The Oahe Reservoir bounds Potter County on the west.  Most of the Indian village sites, Forest City, and the headquarters for the Cheyenne Indian Reservation located in that area were covered by waters from the Oahe in 1957. [Some local farmers and ranchers have noted that they didn't relocate until 1959.]

No one thing in Gettysburg has attracted greater attention than the famed Medicine Rock.  It is reported that Lewis and Clark considered it unusual enough to mention in their journals.  This 10’x20’ limestone rock was originally located on a bluff fifteen miles west of Gettysburg.  Its significance is attributed to the imprint in the hard rock of five tracks of bare human feet.  When first discovered, the heel marks were 2.5 in. deep.  The early Sioux Indians believed these were the footprints of the Great Spirit, Medicine Rock.  In addition to the footprints, there are two depressions at the lower end that resemble the claws of a large animal.  The Medicine Rock currently holds a place of prominence at the Dakota Sunset Museum in downtown Gettysburg.
 
In 2011 Gettysburg is a friendly community of 1100 people and 200 licensed businesses including a medical center with a variety of services.  Farming and ranching provide the economic base; however, recreational activities including hunting, fishing, and golf are beginning to play a larger role.


Potter County Trivia

Q: Did someone really discover a petrified man buried near old Forest City in Potter County, SD?

A: The story of Potter County's petrified man is told in Stanley Vestal's book THE MISSOURI. Briefly, the petrified man was a hoax concocted by bored locals who created a petrified body and buried it near Forest City. So successful was the hoax that the locals took the body to the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, exhibiting it all along the way for a dollar a viewing. The hoax wasn't exposed until after the turn of the century when they repeated the stunt and tried to sell the next body. The buyer and his wife got into such a terrible fight over the purchase that the buyer murdered his wife and then killed himself.

Q: What caused the demise of old LeBeau?

A: Murder . While not exactly in Potter County, LeBeau was close by in Walworth County....
On December 11, 1909, a bartender, "Bud" Stephens, in DuFran's saloon shot David G. "Dode" Mackenzie twice in the chest. Mackenzie was the son of Murdo Mackenzie, the legendary cattle baron and general manager of the Matador. As Dode staggered out the door of the saloon, the bartender pumped another two bullets into Dode's back. Bud was tried for murder. Murdo Mackenzie hired one of the highest priced lawyers available to prosecute Stephens. Saloonkeeper DuFran could only afford a young, still wet-behind-the-ears, 23 year-old attorney to defend Stephens. The jury was composed of homesteaders who had no use for the Matador. In March, Stephens was acquitted -- self defense. An angry Murdo MacKenzie never shipped another load of cattle out of LeBeau. About two months following the acquittal, a major portion of the town burned down -- arson by persons unknown. With no cattle to ship, the railroad pulled up its tracks. The town has not exactly dried up -- it is now under the waters of the Oahe Reservoir.

More Potter County Trivia:
The First Non-Native Settler in Potter County was Eli Bacon Vincent, who was born in Ohio in 1850 and graduated from Michigan University Law School in 1873. Starting a law practice proved to be too slow for him, so he pulled up stakes and moved west. He landed at Fort Sully, and afterwards at Fort Bennett across the Missouri River from Fort Sully. The year was 1875.

For four years after that he worked for the US government as the Boss Farmer at the Cheyenne River Agency. The native people nicknamed him Enochenee which meant “Hurry up” because hurrying to get things done was his principle of life.

He then bought 700 acres on the Missouri River bottom and tried his hand at ranching, but by 1884 he had sold out & returned to his hometown in Ohio where he married and raised his children. He died there in 1939.

 

GENEALOGY and LOCAL HISTORY

Obituaries from 1883 to the present are located at the Dakota Sunset Museum.

Materials listed below are found at the Potter County Library.  If you find something useful on the list, be sure to check the Dakota Sunset Museum for additional information not available through the library.

> 75 YEARS OF PROGRESS 1883-1958 : HOVEN, SOUTH DAKOTA
> 75 YEARS OF SULLY COUNTY 1883-1958
> 75th ANNIVERSARY, LEBANON, SOUTH DAKOTA

> 100 YEARS OF PROUD PEOPLE (SULLY COUNTY) 1883-1983
> 903rd REUNION – video 1997  

> AGAR, SD, CENTENNIAL PHOTOS & INFORMATION from Edna Falkenhagen Smith Collection, compiled by Georga Sutton
> ALUMNI DIRECTORY : GETTYSBURG HIGH SCHOOL : 2000

> AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF WILLIAM BOERGER
> BIOGRAPHICAL DIRECTORY SOUTH DAKOTA LEGISLATURE 1889-1989
> BREAKING SOD ON THE PRAIRIES by Clarence W. Taber - historical fiction set in Arena Township, Potter County, SD

> BULKLEY COMMUNITY
> Buller Family
> CATHEDRAL OF THE PRAIRIE - video
> CATTLE ON A THOUSAND HILLS – Sutton Ranch history

> CEMETERY RECORDS FOR POTTER COUNTY, SD
> CLARENCE WILBUR TABER, AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY
> DAKOTA COWBOY by Ike Blasingame - nonfiction -- life at the time of the Matador Land and Cattle Company between Gettysburg, SD and Eagle Butte, SD.
> DESCENDANTS OF GEORGE & CAROLINE JELI 1845-1991 by Michael and Dianne Jeli – genealogy
> DESTINATION GETTYSBURG – video

> DIAMOND JUBILEE 1886-1961, BOWDLE, SD
> DuFLOTH Family History by Beulah M. DuFloth White
> ELIDA TOWNSHIP by Rella Frankhauser McIntosh 

> FOREST CITY BRIDGE (SD DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION DOCUMENTS)
> FRANSEN FAMILY by Darrell Fransen -- genealogy
> GEORGE AND CHRISTINA RIPLEY FAMILY
> GEORGE B. VANCE - genealogy 
> GETTYSBURG 1883-2008 SLIDE SHOW created by Dakota Sunset Museum
> GETTYSBURG CENTENNIAL STYLE SHOW – 1983 -- video
> GETTYSBURG: THE LEGACY LIVES ON -- video
> GETTYSBURG SOUTH DAKOTA 75TH ANNIVERSARY 1883-1958 – history

> GHS Class of 1956 reunion books
> GRANDPA AND GRANDMA MILLAR’S BIG HOUSE BY STONE LAKE by Millar – genealogy

> History of Sutton Ranch by Matt Sutton
> HOMESTEAD ATLAS, POTTER COUNTY
> HOVEN ALL FAITH CENTENNIAL - video
> HOVEN SOUTH DAKOTA 1883-1983 – history

> HOVEN, SOUTH DAKOTA - 25 YEAR SUPPLEMENT, 1983-2008, QUASQUICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION
> IN THE WORLD WAR 1917-1918-1919 POTTER COUNTY SOUTH DAKOTA
> IN THE SPIRIT OF McKAYLA by Vonnie Reuer and Rhonda Strouckel – music cassette
> POTTER COUNTY IN THIS WORLD WAR 1917-1918- 1919 - history
> INGA by Harold W. Anderson - Jordeth genealogy
> JORDETH by Inga Jordeth Haanstad -- genealogy

LAST BRIDGE and A DISTANT PROMISE – both by Elvera Ziebart Reuer – WWII history 
> LEBANON S.D. 1884-1984 – history
> LEBANON, SD - 125th CELEBRATION - home video by Merlyn Schutterle
> LEBANON CEMETERY RECORDS by Caroline Titze
> LeBEAU, A SPUTTERING GLAME by Dale and Mary Lewis
> Life Story of Heinrich Buller and His Wife Agnetha Duerksen Buller by William Buller
> LOOK BACK ONCE IN AWHILE by Ed Carlson -- memoirs

> LOWRY, SD 1907 - 2007; A PHOTO ESSAY by Ken Vogele & Lowryites
> MAGNIFICENT CHURCHES ON THE PRAIRIE by Coomber
> NOLD FAMILY, THE by Mary Ragatz Alexander - genealogy

> OBITUARY BOOK, POTTER COUNTY – 1883 to present
> OLIVER FAMILY HISTORY
> PIONEER ON THE PRAIRIE: THE LIFE OF IVAR SANDBERG by Gilbert Ivar Sandberg

>  PHOTOS OF POTTER COUNTY PLACES 2008  (on CD)
> POTTER COUNTY PEOPLE PICTURES and PROGRESS : 1883-1983 – history of Gettysburg

> Prairie Minister's Wife by Arlue Nix Thomas
> Rausch Family  http://www.rl-anc.com/index.php               http://www.rauschherefords.com/
> RECIPES FOR THE HEART, THE HEARTH, THE HOME by children of Nick and Catherine Rausch – recipes and history 
>  SENECA CENTENNIAL book 1884-1984
> South Dakota Dept. of History Collections 1902 to present
> SULLY COUNTY CENTENNIAL PHOTO BOOK
> SULLY COUNTY QUASQUICENTENNIAL  1883-2008
> SUN RISES WITH THE HOVENS by Jeannette L. Anderson and committee -- history of Hoven Family and related families in Potter County, SD. 
> SUTTON BOOK - genealogy

> TALE OF THREE FAMILIES by Elizabeth G. Longstreth -- Gillpatrick genealogy 
> TOLSTOY BIOGRAPHIES and TOLSTOY DIAMOND JUBILEE HISTORICAL BOOK 1982
> TURKEY RED by Frances Gilchrist Wood - historical fiction

> VAN BOCKEL FAMILY - genealogy
> VETERANS OF THE CIVIL WAR WHO SETTLED IN POTTER COUNTY DAKOTA TERRITORY by Winifred Fawcett and Thelma Hepper. ** Index online at Veterans book index
> WE ARE AMERICANS by Marion Cronin Crowley - genealogy
> WHAT YOU CAN DO WITH FIFTY CENTS by Ernie Nagel -- memoirs 1915-1980
> WHEN THE SOUTH WIND BLEW SOFTLY by Gertrude E. Flyte -- memoirs 1890-1973

> Online Potter County Database


Potter County History in the vertical file at the library includes Falk Family of North Riverside Township,  Courthouse, Appomattox Township,  Flood at Appomattox in 1890,  Forest City, Gorman, Homestead Records,  (separate book of Homestead Records Index),  Hoven burials,  LeBeau Community,  Mary Duenwald Arbach Hoven,  Turkey Red by Frances Gilchrist Wood, Tolstoy,  Schools Rural,  R E A & Cam-Wal,  Medicine Rock, 

Genealogy Trails Online -----  Potter County link

Your Potter County ancestor just might be in one of these books which can be found either at the Potter County Library or at the Dakota Sunset Museum.  Some are now online as well.

Doane Robinson's Encyclopedia of South Dakota, c1925

HISTORY OF DAKOTA TERRITORY by George W. Kingsbury / SOUTH DAKOTA ITS HISTORY AND ITS PEOPLE edited by George Martin Smith,  Vol. I,  S.J. Clarke Publishing, c1915

HISTORY OF DAKOTA TERRITORY by George W. Kingsbury / SOUTH DAKOTA ITS HISTORY AND ITS PEOPLE edited by George Martin Smith,  Vol. 2,  S.J. Clarke Publishing, c1915

HISTORY OF DAKOTA TERRITORY by George W. Kingsbury / SOUTH DAKOTA ITS HISTORY AND ITS PEOPLE edited by George Martin Smith,  Vol. 3,  S.J. Clarke Publishing, c1915

HISTORY OF DAKOTA TERRITORY by George W. Kingsbury / SOUTH DAKOTA ITS HISTORY AND ITS PEOPLE edited by George Martin Smith,  Vol. 4,  S.J. Clarke Publishing, c1915

HISTORY OF DAKOTA TERRITORY by George W. Kingsbury / SOUTH DAKOTA ITS HISTORY AND ITS PEOPLE edited by George Martin Smith,  Vol. 5,  S.J. Clarke Publishing, c1915

MEMORIAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD AND ILLUSTRATED COMPENDIUM OF BIOGRAPHY, Published by Geo. A. Ogle & Co, c1890.  [includes A.G. and Morris Williams]

COMPENDIUM OF BIOGRAPHY [includes biographical sketches from Central South Dakota]  -- rebound, title page missing, but spine says 1899,  appears to be another volume of MEMORIAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD AND ILLUSTRATED COMPENDIUM OF BIOGRAPHY, Published by Geo. A. Ogle & Co -- includes A.G. and Morris Williams, but biosketches are not identical to the 1890 edition.

HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA by Doane Robinson together with personal mention of citizens of South Dakota, Vol I.  B. F. Bowen & Co., 1904.

HISTORY OF SOUTH DAKOTA by Doane Robinson together with personal mention of citizens of South Dakota. Vol. 2, B.F. Bowen & Co., c1904.

Bound volumes of SOUTH DAKOTA HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS; ILLUSTRATED WITH MAPS AND ENGRAVINGS compiled by the State Historical Society beginning with Vol. 1, 1902 and continuing through 2013.  Includes Cumulative Index compiled in 1989.    Missing volumes: The 1910 Volume 5.


GETTYSBURG's 75th ANNIVERSARY (1883-1958) book is for sale at the Potter County Library.
GETTYSBURG'S 100th Anniversary book (Potter County People, Pictures, and Progress 1883-1983) is for sale at the Dakota Sunset Museum.

None of the information in the 75th Anniversary book is duplicated in the 100th Anniversary Book.

SD War Memorials
SD Korean War Site
SD World War II SD Fallen Sons and Daughters
Vietnam War / Baltezore: Teddy Baltezore
SD Vietnam Memorial Site 
Virtual Wall of all those lost during the Vietnam War          http://www.virtualwall.org/iStates.htm  Click on your State.Scroll down to your city.Soldiers’ names are listed beneath the city name.Click on a name to see a picture of the soldier, his medals, and the link to the database for his military and casualty info.

PRAIRIE READS & LOCAL HISTORY

BENDING THE TWIG a memoir by Kenneth Goetz. The story of a boy growing up on the Dakota Prairie (Potter and Sully Counties) during the Depression and World War II.

WHILE THE COYOTE HOWLS Written in 1933 by Alice McDonald Edmunds (Mrs. Andrew Edmunds) -- about her family and life in Potter County. Full text in 63 pages is available via email attachment. 63 pages. Request by emailing the library at pclibrary@venturecomm.net

BREAKING SOD ON THE PRAIRIES by Clarence Wilbur Taber. Historical fiction account of Taber's homesteading experience in Potter County. The World Book Company as part of their “In Pioneer Life Series” published it in 1924. Taber grew to adulthood in Potter County where he became a banker, married the daughter of one of Gettysburg's founders, and had three children. By 1900, Taber, dissatisfied with banking, moved his family to Minneapolis, but he never forgot South Dakota.While the BREAKING SOD book is invaluable to Potter County history, it is not the book for which Taber is best known. Long before BREAKING SOD was written, he wrote TABER'S MEDICAL DICTIONARY FOR NURSES. It was this book that brought him to the attention of the F.A. Davis Company where his dictionary was published as TABER'S CYCLOPEDIC MEDICAL DICTIONARY. It was an instant success, has become the standard for nurses, and is now in its 20th edition.Taber died in 1968. His portrait still hangs in the boardroom at the F.A. Davis Company in Philadelphia, PA. and the history of the company devotes an entire chapter to his life.

THE WORK OF WOLVES by Kent Meyers. SD fiction set in the Badlands. SD author. A four-star recommendation.

LeBEAU by Dale and Mary Lewis. True story of the once flourishing cattle town of LeBeau, South Dakota and the murder that ended its reign as railroad king. Its location between Gettysburg and Mobridge is now under the waters of Lake Oahe. Consultant for the book was Gettysburg rancher Clint Parker

Excerpt from THE BATTLE OF SHILOH by Samuel M. Howard, who lived through it. p 130 "Again I hear the roar and crash of guns, 'til the whole earth rocks beneath it. .... Again I see brave General Peabody wage the unequal strife of one small brigade against two corps of the enemy and fall dead from his horse just as the enemy swarms around both flanks of the Sixth Division ... The past rises before me when the ominous hour of 10 o'clock overtakes the combatants, when more than 80,000 men, with 300 great guns and 80,000 muskets, wage the deadliest great battle of all time; 'til more than 26,000 soldiers fall upon that fearful field, either killed or wounded, while everywhere the very flesh is quivering on the bones of both the living and the dead ... Again I see and hear the screaming and bursting of shells and the closing in of the dreadful circling walls of brimstone fire -- flash on flash, flash on flash, flash on flash ... Again I hear the heartrending appeals for help by the mangled and dying .... Again I see the whole Peach Orchard where General Albert Sidney Johnston fell, so thickly carpeted with dead that one can walk in any direction stepping on the bodies of the dead all the time, without a foot touching the ground."

Gettysburg's Air Force Radar Station

Manned by the 903rd AC&W Squadron, Gettysburg became operational in 1956. The Air Force deactivated the 903rd Radar Squadron (SAGE) on 18 June 1968. The FAA continues to operate long-range radar there today using an AN/FPS-67B search radar atop the old AN/FPS-27 radar tower.

Click one of the links below to find:
Documents relating to 903rd Gettysburg AFS, SD
Gettysburg History, c. 1958
First Mess Hall Meal, Arctic Towers, Other 1956 News
FAA Radar article - 1999
Building Gettysburg AFS, 1955
Winter Scenes
Gettysburg AFS "Only A Legend" - 1999
FUDS Findings of Fact
Site Closing Newspaper Article
Work Progressing Rapidly, Sept. 1955 News
Site Roster
Photographs
Recent photos
Main Site Aerial Photos
Housing Area Aerial Photos
Offsite (Local) GATR Aerial Photos
Main Site Topographic Map
Housing Area Topographic Map
Site History (brief, official history)
Aerial Images
OR
Click this link: RADAR SITES
Input this data: Unit - 903; Site ID - M-99; SAGE ID - Z-99; Location - Gettysburg, SD.

FYI: KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS

Use keyboard shortcuts to do frequent tasks instead of moving the mouse and clicking icons.

To perform a keyboard shortcut, you press two, three, or sometimes four keyboard keys at the same time. If that sounds tricky, keep this in mind: You can press and hold the Control (CTRL) key first and then press the other key(s). If you're a Mac user, use the Command (CMD) key instead of the CTRL key for the keyboard shortcuts below.

Here are some of the most popular keyboard shortcuts:

CTRL+S (Save)
The first rule of computer use is to save your work often. You never know when the program you're using, or your entire computer, is going to crash. It's a good idea to use this shortcut after every few sentences you write.

CTRL+Z (Undo)
This shortcut lets you undo a mistake very quickly. Pressing CTRL+Z several times will often undo the last several changes.

CTRL+A (Selects all - highlights the entire page/document)
CTRL+C (Copy)
CTRL+V (Paste)

If you do a lot of copying and pasting of text, these keyboard shortcuts will really save you time. Just use the mouse to select what you want to copy, press CTRL+C, click the mouse where you want to paste, and press CTRL+V.

There are hundreds of other keyboard shortcuts and, depending on your computer habits, you may want to learn more of them. For complete information, visit this site for Windows or this site for Mac.